I was surprised to hear that John Hinckley Jr., the man who shot President Ronald Reagan was unconditionally released by a federal judge.

I remember that day, March 30, 1981 at 2:27 p.m., because I had just gotten home from school and since I lived across the street from the school, it didn't take long to get home. My dad worked at night so he was getting ready to leave for work. We had the TV on and they showed Reagan leaving the hotel after a speech and we saw the shooting in real time and couldn't believe what had just happened.

John Hinckley Jr. attempted to assassinate then President Ronald Reagan by shooting a Rohm RG 14 .22 LR blue steel revolver six times. Hinkley Jr. missed Reagan all six shots.

Hinkley Jr. did hit White House Press Secretary James Brady in the head above is left eye. He also shot District of Columbia police officer Thomas Delahanty in the back of his neck.

In a second round of shots, Hinckley Jr. shot Secret Service agent Tim McCarthy who was acting as a human shield while others were trying to get President Reagan into the limousine.

As the presidential limousine was driving away a bullet ricocheted off the armored side of the limousine and went through a crack in the door into the underarm of President Reagan.

This was a failed assassination attempt on a president and 3 others and my mind is blown that the shooter is able to walk free from prison.

A federal judge gave Hinckley Jr. an unconditional release. According to FOX 17, Hinkley will be eligible for full release in June of 2022. He is currently living under court imposed conditions on convalescent leave in Williamsburg, Virginia.

A year ago, the Department of Behavioral Health asked that Hinckley be released with no conditions because they say he poses low threat for future violence.

I am uncomfortable with the term 'low threat', Hinckley shot 4 people, and in the manor that he attempted to take their lives, he should never be released.

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