I posted about squirrel problems around West Michigan. I talked about the fact that they were becoming too brazen, they were trying to break into my screened-in porch, and a window. They were everywhere.

Then just a couple weeks ago a squirrel knocked out the power to over 100 stoplights throughout the city of Grand Rapids further proving my problem with the squirrels. Yes, I’m starting to realize I will be that old man that constantly yells at squirrels. Then with the Fourth of July, and all the fireworks, they kind of scared off the squirrels, and since then I haven’t noticed quite the problem. That is until I saw the story on Fox 2 Detroit.

They are reporting that in Colorado, in the town of Morrison, which is just 17 miles southwest of Denver, a squirrel there tested positive for the bubonic plague. That’s a plague that killed people in history, and now in 2020, a squirrel has tested positive in Colorado.

According to the news story on Fox 2,

“Plague is an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, and can be contracted by humans and household animals.”

Health officials say though, in the real scheme of things, if proper precautions are taken, which would be washing your hands and not touching which were already doing things to the coronavirus the risk of getting the plague is extremely low. Usually, humans contract it through their cat, which cats are more susceptible to getting it than dogs, and they get it through flea bites, and then also bring those fleas into the house, where you are, Fox 2 reports.

Keep in mind, currently, it’s in Colorado, although we have a LOT of squirrels here; that have NOT tested positive for the plague.

Officials said the best way to protect both humans and animals is to make sure your pets have good flea protection, which hopefully is something you already worry about with your pets.

Curious about the symptoms of the bubonic plague? Fox 2 says they are high fever, chills, headache, and nausea; and it usually happens within a week of contracting it and is treatable.

Still... 2020, am I right?

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