Isn't it interesting that much of America has a diet issue, yet we have two cooking networks on cable TV and ABC soon begins it's all-cooking daytime TV line-up? And at the same time, we have TV shows like "Biggest Loser."

Reality shows focused on weight loss affect more than just the participants. According to a new Thomson Reuters poll, 57-percent of the people who regularly watch these types of shows say the programs have influenced the way they eat. In addition, 48-percent report they've been inspired to change their exercise habits. The affects are the most pronounced on those medically considered to be overweight or obese, and on viewers 35 and younger. Among these groups, nearly three quarters say the shows have had an impact on their lives regarding diet and exercise. By comparison, just 25-percent of people considered to be a healthy weight say the shows have made a difference in the way they eat and exercise.

The majority of those under the age of 36 are also the most inclined to believe weight-loss reality shows are helpful to society, with 59-percent saying they feel the programs are making a positive difference in the health of Americans in general.