Remember when the question was "should weed be legalized?" Currently, the pot business is blooming and booming in Grand Rapids that it's become a norm to see dispensaries all around town. But the question now is, "should psychedelics be legalized?" A group is aiming to make that happen.

Decriminalize Natural Grand Rapids is an advocacy group that raises awareness and for psychedelics that come from natural plants and fungi and the benefits they pose. If you're interested in learning more about the group's mission and how these plants serve as medicine, a "friend-raising" event will be held Thursday, July 29 at the Pyramid Scheme, in Downtown Grand Rapids, from 5p-7p. According to their website,

We pursue these health benefits by working to inform the community of promising new research about entheogenic plants and fungi.

DNGR's goal is to get the following psychedelics legalized:

  • Mushrooms containing psilocybin
  • Cacti containing mescaline
  • Ayahuasca tea
  • Plants containing ibogaine

All of these possess healing abilities for conditions like anxiety, depression, PSTD, addiction. Some also encourage creativity. Their website has a breakdown of the natural plants and fungi and their benefits, including proven research.

The event will feature two keynote speakers

Professors DeWilde, MTS, professor of management and philosophy at Grand Valley State University, and John Mulder, MD, Executive Director of the Trillium Institute (via WZZM).

The main purpose is to get the community educated and the city commission approving to decriminalize it by this fall.

The listed plants that the group is advocating for are all presently illegal in Grand Rapids and their goal is to make it legal for personal use, as an alternative form of medicine.

To no surprise, Ann Arbor became the first city in Michigan to decriminalize "magic mushrooms" and psychedelic plants last September. In 2019, Denver was the first U.S. city to completely make it legal.

What do you think? Like marijuana, should psychedelics also be legalized?

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