The building has stood at the corner of Monroe Center and Ionia for 92 years, and from the outside, looks the same. But, the look inside of The Morton is definitely not old fashioned.

Over half of the units have already been leased, according to management, and residents will begin moving in mid-September according to Mike Mraz, a partner with Rockford Development.

Unlike many a lot of the apartments found in converted warehouses around the city, you'll find no exposed brick or ductwork inside The Morton.

"We wanted to give it a more modern look. After talking to our employees and friends it was obvious that that's the kind of look people want," Mraz told me.

The former hotel (which at one point also housed a sanitarium on the 12th floor, and later became government subsized housing) now contains 50 one-bedroom apartments (with rent starting at $1,300 per month; 32 studio apartments (rents start at $1,000), and 18 two-bedroom apartments (rent starts at $1,900 a month). Every unit includes a washer and dryer and a 49" Internet-ready television.

Eight of the studio apartments feature these really cool products called "Urbaneer". They're a Rockford-developed line of built-in furniture and shelving that are designed to maximize space. The Urbaneer studio apartments feature a Murphy Bed that converts into a couch, and a kitchen island that converts into a coffee table.

One of the biggest selling points of The Morton (for me, anyway) is that it's extremely pet friendly. No only are you allowed to have pets (47 lbs. and smaller), but they also will have a pet recreation center, a dog washing station, and a place where dogs can relieve themselves indoors during inclement weather. Pet owners will be charged an extra $25 per month.

Other features included with rent at The Morton include an outdoor courtyard deck with gas grills, synthetic turf, and patio furniture; an exercise facility, and a community room.

There is no on-site parking, but there are city parking ramps with spaces for lease nearby.

Currently, Rockford is in talks with several restaurants and retailers about occupying the street and lower levels of the building.

The building has sat empty since 2011, when its previous owners ended their 40-year run as a federally subsidized housing project.